Loughton's Iron Age Camp
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Loughton's Iron Age Camp

One of London's finest Iron Age forts, deep within Epping Forest


Loughton Camp is an Iron Age (500BC) hill fort in Epping Forest, a mile North West of Loughton. The earthworks cover an area of 10 acres and are visible today as a low bank and ditch encircling a now forested main camp. The banks were most probably once a single high rampart, used for defence and the appearance of the ditch suggests it was once very wide and deep in places.

Speculation surrounds the legend that Boudica once used it, and more likely it was a base for one of the ancient British tribes such as the Trinovantes who dominated the area north of the Thames.

A further set of ancient earthworks are a mile further north at a site called Ambresbury Banks.

The camp was discovered by local priest Benjamin Harris Cowper in 1872 and the first archaeology carried out was by General Pitt-Rivers in 1881. In 1882 the Essex Field Club further excavated the banks.

Location: Loughton Camp, Loughton, Epping Forest